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The good news in the bad news

Here are some not-so-fun facts to pull out for your next dinner party: for many in Canada, trust in news keeps waning. However, our readers buck the trend, allowing us to deliver impactful coverage

You hear the cry constantly: journalism is in crisis.

But when something gets repeated so much, it starts to lose its meaning. So why don’t we give you some facts to keep in your back pocket for a dinner party?

Just 37 per cent of Canadians have trust in news. That’s down from 58 per cent in 2018.

Four in 10 feel worn out by the amount of news.

Half the country isn’t willing to pay anything for online news.

Pretty bleak, huh? And that’s before I mention that of the 15 per cent of people in Canada who pay for online news, most contribute to just a single publication — with 43 per cent subscribing to foreign outlets like the New York Times and only 10 per cent contributing to a local news source.

As I pored over the massive 2024 Reuters Institute Digital News Report this week, I found one piece of hope: 37 per cent of people in Canada who don’t pay for online news are willing to give something each month.

Another reason I have hope? In the 10 days since we launched The Narwhal’s June membership drive, 250 readers have stepped up to become monthly or annual members. That’s 250 of you who might have made a regular contribution to a Canadian news organization for the very first time. 

If you’ve been meaning to contribute to The Narwhal, please sign up today — it only takes two minutes, and we’re just 50 members away from reaching our June membership goal.

At a time when trust in news is at an all-time low, you haven’t lost your trust in us. In fact, trust in The Narwhal’s journalism has grown every year, as more people read and support our independent reporting on the most pressing environment and climate issues of our time.

But the reality is only a tiny fraction of people who read The Narwhal’s stories make the leap with a tax-deductible donation to support our non-profit journalism. 

Here at The Narwhal, we don’t run any ads and we don’t put up a paywall. We believe our public-interest journalism should be free for all to read, regardless of whether you have the financial means. 

That commitment relies on our trust in readers like you: that enough of you who do have the means, will find value in our work and give whatever they can afford — say, the cost of a cup of coffee a month.

We still need to add 50 new members this month to make our budget work. If you believe in the power of independent journalism, will you help us buck the trend and not only survive, but thrive, for years to come?

Like a kid in a candy store
When those boxes of heavily redacted documents start to pile in, reporters at The Narwhal waste no time in looking for kernels of news that matter the most. Just ask our Prairies reporter Drew Anderson, who gleefully scanned through freedom of information files like a kid in a candy store, leading to pretty damning revelations in Alberta. Long story short: the government wasn’t being forthright when it claimed its pause on new renewable energy projects wasn’t political. Just like that, our small team was again leading the charge on a pretty big story

In an oil-rich province like Alberta, that kind of reporting is crucial. But look at our investigative work on TC Energy’s Coastal GasLink pipeline to the west, or our Greenbelt reporting out in Ontario. They all highlight one thing: those with power over our shared natural world don’t want you to know how — or why — they call the shots. And we try to disrupt that.

Our journalism is powered by people just like you. We never take corporate ad dollars, or put this public-interest information behind a paywall. Will you join the pod of Narwhals that make a difference by helping us uncover some of the most important stories of our time?
Like a kid in a candy store
When those boxes of heavily redacted documents start to pile in, reporters at The Narwhal waste no time in looking for kernels of news that matter the most. Just ask our Prairies reporter Drew Anderson, who gleefully scanned through freedom of information files like a kid in a candy store, leading to pretty damning revelations in Alberta. Long story short: the government wasn’t being forthright when it claimed its pause on new renewable energy projects wasn’t political. Just like that, our small team was again leading the charge on a pretty big story

In an oil-rich province like Alberta, that kind of reporting is crucial. But look at our investigative work on TC Energy’s Coastal GasLink pipeline to the west, or our Greenbelt reporting out in Ontario. They all highlight one thing: those with power over our shared natural world don’t want you to know how — or why — they call the shots. And we try to disrupt that.

Our journalism is powered by people just like you. We never take corporate ad dollars, or put this public-interest information behind a paywall. Will you join the pod of Narwhals that make a difference by helping us uncover some of the most important stories of our time?

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An illustration, in yellow, of a computer, with an open envelope inside it with letter reading 'Breaking news.'
Our newsletter subscribers are the first to find out when we break a major investigation. Want in? Sign up for free to get the inside scoop on The Narwhal’s reporting on the natural world.
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An illustration, in yellow, of a computer, with an open envelope inside it with letter reading 'Breaking news.'
Our newsletter subscribers are the first to find out when we break a major investigation. Want in? Sign up for free to get the inside scoop on The Narwhal’s reporting on the natural world.
Hey, are you on our list?
An illustration, in yellow, of a computer, with an open envelope inside it with letter reading 'Breaking news.'