Taseko New Prosperity mine timeline

A timeline of the never-ending saga that is the Taseko New Prosperity mine

The volley of legal challenges surrounding the $1.5 billion gold and copper project is dizzying. Here's some help.

A decade-long battle to build a $1.5 billion gold and copper mine in the traditional territory of the Tsilhqot’in First Nation is back in a federal court — again.

The legal twists and turns of this project, first proposed back in 2008, are many and hard to keep track of.

Between defamation lawsuits, rejected project proposals and lost judicial reviews it’s near impossible to stay on top of this controversial mining proposal, although that’s exactly what the Tsilhqot’in First Nation has had to do at every step of the way.

The Narwhal created a handy-dandy timeline to help layout the flow of legal proceedings that continue to this day.

Taseko New Prosperity Timeline

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We hear it time and time again:
“These are the stories that need to be told and you are some of the only ones telling them,” John, a new member of The Narwhal, wrote in to say.

Investigating stories others aren’t. Diving deep to find solutions to the climate crisis. Sending journalists to report from remote locations for days and sometimes weeks on end. These are the core tenets of what we do here at The Narwhal. It’s also the kind of work that takes time and resources to pull off.

That might sound obvious, but it’s far from reality in many shrinking and cash-strapped Canadian newsrooms. So what’s The Narwhal’s secret sauce? Thousands of members like John who support our non-profit, ad-free journalism by giving whatever they can afford each month (or year).

But here’s the thing: just two per cent of The Narwhal’s readers step up to keep our stories free for all to read. Will you join the two per cent and become a member of The Narwhal today?

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