Sakhalin LNG facility

LNG

Liquefied natural gas, or LNG, is natural gas that has been cooled to below 160 degrees Celsius, compressed and turned into a liquid for transport. In British Columbia, where there is abundant natural gas, the provincial government is seeking investment by companies to develop an LNG export industry to feed a growing Asian market.

The prospect of developing an LNG industry in B.C. has been controversial because natural gas in the province is developed via hydraulic fracturing or fracking. Fracking uses significant amounts of water, often mixed with chemicals, and has been shown to induce earthquakes. Some First Nations have voiced concerns about further scaling up fracking in their territories.

Developing an LNG industry presents major challenges to meeting B.C.’s climate targets. In addition to emissions from extracting natural gas, cooling gas into a liquid for export requires running large compression units 24/7. Most plants plan to fuel their compressor units with natural gas, creating additional greenhouse gas emissions in the process.

The LNG Canada project, given the green light by investors in October 2018, will produce 9.6 megatonnes of carbon per year by 2050, according to the Pembina Institute. By 2050, B.C.’s legislated target for total carbon pollution is 13 megatonnes a year.

Latest News about "LNG"

Federal government could intervene on Greenbelt development, Guilbeault warns Ontario

Federal Environment Minister Steven Guilbeault says he doesn’t believe the Ontario government’s claims about the need to build homes in the Greenbelt, and could intervene...

Continue reading
Our members make The Narwhal’s ad-free, independent journalism possible. Will you join the pod?
Help power our ad-free, independent journalism
Investigating problems. Exploring solutions
The Narwhal’s reporters are telling environment stories you won’t read about anywhere else. Stay in the loop by signing up for a weekly dose of independent journalism.
Investigating problems. Exploring solutions
The Narwhal’s reporters are telling environment stories you won’t read about anywhere else. Stay in the loop by signing up for a weekly dose of independent journalism.