adrian-dix.jpg

BC Election 2013: NDP Leader Dix Formally Opposes Kinder Morgan Pipeline Expansion

The thought of more oil tankers and pipelines along the pristine coastline of Vancouver, British Columbia is a pretty disturbing thought for most people living in the area. While some tankers do ply the waters, Vancouver is a major tourist destination that relies heavily on its natural beauty and amazing ocean-scapes. 

Adrian Dix, the leader of BC's New Democratic Party, announced today that his party officially opposes a proposed project that would see more oil pumped from Alberta's tar sands to Vancouver's coast. Dix, considered the front-runner in the provincial election underway in the province, told reporters,

“They are talking about an increase of five- or six-fold [in capacity] and I think that transforms Vancouver into a major oil export port. I don’t think people in Vancouver see that as the right way to go, and I don’t think that’s the right way to go."

"It seems to me that increasing from 80,000 barrels a day to 450,000 barrels a day (exported from Metro Vancouver in tankers) is a massive change in the nature of that operation," he said.

"That's a real problem."
 

The pipeline expansion project proposed by energy company Kinder Morgan has been met with a great deal of opposition from BC residents, as has the proposed tar sands pipeline known as the Enbridge Northern Gateway project, designed to carry tar sands bitumen from Alberta to the coastal town of Kitimat for export.

Dix promised a new round of environmental assessments on the Northern Gateway pipeline, but has not voiced outright opposition to the project. Today's announcement regarding Kinder Morgan caused some to speculate Dix may be positioning his government-in-waiting to approve the Northern Gateway in the future. Although Dix clarified his party, if in power, will not cede decision making power on Northern Gateway to the federal government.

Polling over the years has consistently shown that, on average, 60 percent of British Columbians oppose the Enbridge Northern Gateway project, while a recent poll finds that 57 percent of British Columbians oppose the Kinder Morgan plan. 

Watch Adrian Dix's statement on Kinder Morgan:

Like a kid in a candy store
When those boxes of heavily redacted documents start to pile in, reporters at The Narwhal waste no time in looking for kernels of news that matter the most. Just ask our Prairies reporter Drew Anderson, who gleefully scanned through freedom of information files like a kid in a candy store, leading to pretty damning revelations in Alberta this spring. Long story short: the government wasn’t being forthright when it claimed its pause on new renewable energy projects wasn’t political. Just like that, our small team was again leading the charge on a pretty big story

In an oil-rich province like Alberta, that kind of reporting is crucial. But look at our investigative work on the Coastal GasLink pipeline to the west, or our Greenbelt reporting out in Ontario. They all highlight one thing: those with power over our shared natural world don’t want you to know how — or why — they call the shots. And we try to disrupt that.

Our journalism is powered by people just like you. We never take corporate ad dollars, or put this public-interest information behind a paywall. Here’s the thing: we need 300 new members to join this month to meet our budget. Will you join the pod of Narwhals that make a difference by helping us uncover some of the most important stories of our time?
We’ve got big plans for 2024
When those boxes of heavily redacted documents start to pile in, reporters at The Narwhal waste no time in looking for kernels of news that matter the most. Just ask our Prairies reporter Drew Anderson, who gleefully scanned through freedom of information files like a kid in a candy store, leading to pretty damning revelations in Alberta this spring. Long story short: the government wasn’t being forthright when it claimed its pause on new renewable energy projects wasn’t political. Just like that, our small team was again leading the charge on a pretty big story

In an oil-rich province like Alberta, that kind of reporting is crucial. But look at our investigative work on the Coastal GasLink pipeline to the west, or our Greenbelt reporting out in Ontario. They all highlight one thing: those with power over our shared natural world don’t want you to know how — or why — they call the shots. And we try to disrupt that.

Our journalism is powered by people just like you. We never take corporate ad dollars, or put this public-interest information behind a paywall. Here’s the thing: we need 300 new members to join this month to meet our budget. Will you join the pod of Narwhals that make a difference by helping us uncover some of the most important stories of our time?

Canada just pledged to tackle environmental racism. What does that mean?

Ingrid Waldron wrote a book about how pollution, contamination and other environmental ills in Canada affect Indigenous, Black and racialized communities more than others. Along...

Continue reading

Recent Posts

That means our newsletter has become the most important way we connect with Narwhal readers like you. Will you join the nearly 90,000 subscribers getting a weekly dose of in-depth climate reporting?
A line chart in green font colour with the title "Our Facebook traffic has cratered." Chart shows about 750,000 users via Facebook in 2019, 1.2M users in 2020, 500,000 users in 2021, 250,000 users in 2022, 100,000 users in 2023.
Readers used to find us on Facebook. Now we’re blocked
That means our newsletter has become the most important way we connect with Narwhal readers like you. Will you join the nearly 90,000 subscribers getting a weekly dose of in-depth climate reporting?
A line chart in green font colour with the title "Our Facebook traffic has cratered." Chart shows about 750,000 users via Facebook in 2019, 1.2M users in 2020, 500,000 users in 2021, 250,000 users in 2022, 100,000 users in 2023.
Readers used to find us on Facebook. Now we’re blocked
Overlay Image